🍎 Health Hack: It All Begins at Breakfast

“A fiber- and protein-rich breakfast may fend off hunger pangs for longer and provide the energy you need to keep your exercise going.  Follow these tips for eating a healthy breakfast: Instead of eating sugar-laden cereals made from refined grains, try oatmeal, oat bran, or other whole-grain cereals that are high in fiber. Then, throw in some protein, such as milk, yogurt, or chopped nuts. 

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Nutrition Hack: Embrace Whole Grains

4 Benefits of Whole Grains

  1. Bran and fiber slow the breakdown of starch into glucose—thus maintaining a steady blood sugarrather than causing sharp spikes.
  2. Fiber helps lower cholesterol as well as move waste through the digestive tract.
  3. Fiber may also help prevent the formation of small blood clots that can trigger heart attacks or strokes.
  4. Phytochemicals and essential minerals such as magnesium, selenium and copper found in whole grains may protect against some cancers.

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Health Hack: Pass the Guacamole

Avocados Are Giving Your Heart Lots of Love

Avocados are a fun food to eat, they’re nutritious, and they’re a good source of monounsaturated fat, which can reduce your risk of heart disease. A recent study found that LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol was lowered when people replaced the saturated fat in their diet with one Hass avocado a day. The study also found decreases in the LDL particle number and the ratio of LDL to HDL (“good” cholesterol), suggesting avocados have even more cardiovascular benefits. Researchers concluded that avocados may protect the heart in a similar way as olive oil and nuts do in the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet.

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Longevity Tip: Slam the Brakes on Aging

Inflamm-aging appears to be a major consequence of growing old. Can it be prevented or cured? “The key to successful aging and longevity is to decrease chronic inflammation without compromising an acute response when exposed to pathogens.” How do we do that? Nutrition. What we eat is “probably the most powerful and pliable tool that we have to attain a chronic and systemic modulation of aging process…”

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