Wellness Tip ~ Enjoying the Summer

create healthy summer habits

  • Beat the sun and heat with an early morning or evening activity.
  • Wear protective clothing, such as hats, long-sleeve shirts, and long pants or skirts.
  • Use sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15, preferably 30, and reapply frequently.
  • Use sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB.
  • Try to stay in the shade when outdoors during peak sunlight.
  • Go to an air-conditioned gym, do water workouts, or use a fitness video at home.
  • Drink plenty of water before, during, and after exercise.

Source


Poem of Hope by T. Edgar Jones

Each night is followed by its day,
Each storm by fairer weather,
While all the works of nature sing
Their songs of joy together.
Then learn, O heart, their songs of hope!
Cease, soul, thy thankless sorrow;
For though the clouds be dark today,
The sun will shine tomorrow.

T. Edgar Jones.


Sun and Shadow ~ Poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes

SUN AND SHADOW

As I look from the isle, o’er its billows of green,
To the billows of foam-crested blue,
Yon bark, that afar in the distance is seen,
Half dreaming, my eyes will pursue
Now dark in the shadow, she scatters the spray
As the chaff in the stroke of the flail;
Now white as the sea-gull, she flies on her way,
The sun gleaming bright on her sail.

Yet her pilot is thinking of dangers to shun,—
Of breakers that whiten and roar;
How little he cares, if in shadow or sun
They see him who gaze from the shore!
He looks to the beacon that looms from the reef,
To the rock that is under his lee,
As he drifts on the blast, like a wind-wafted leaf,
O’er the gulfs of the desolate sea.

Thus drifting afar to the dim-vaulted caves
Where life and its ventures are laid,
The dreamers who gaze while we battle the waves
May see us in sunshine or shade;
Yet true to our course, though the shadows grow dark,
We’ll trim our broad sail as before,
And stand by the rudder that governs the bark,
Nor ask how we look from the shore!




“Evening Star” Poem by Longfellow

Evening Star

Henry Wardworth Longfellow

Lo! in the painted oriel of the West,
Whose panes the sunken sun incarnadines,
Like a fair lady at her casement, shines
The evening star, the star of love and rest!
And then anon she doth herself divest
Of all her radiant garments, and reclines
Behind the sombre screen of yonder pines,
With slumber and soft dreams of love oppressed.
O my beloved, my sweet Hesperus!
My morning and my evening star of love!
My best and gentlest lady! even thus,
As that fair planet in the sky above,
Dost thou retire unto thy rest at night,
And from thy darkened window fades the light.