“Song of Joys” Poem by Walt Whitman

Song Of Joys

O to make the most jubilant song!
Full of music-full of manhood, womanhood, infancy!
Full of common employments-full of grain and trees.

O for the voices of animals-O for the swiftness and balance of fishes!
O for the dropping of raindrops in a song!
O for the sunshine and motion of waves in a song!

O the joy of my spirit-it is uncaged-it darts like lightning!
It is not enough to have this globe or a certain time,
I will have thousands of globes and all time.

O the engineer’s joys! to go with a locomotive!
To hear the hiss of steam, the merry shriek, the steam-whistle, the
laughing locomotive!
To push with resistless way and speed off in the distance.

O the gleesome saunter over fields and hillsides!
The leaves and flowers of the commonest weeds, the moist fresh
stillness of the woods,
The exquisite smell of the earth at daybreak, and all through the
forenoon.

Excerpt from Song of Joys by Walt Whitman

retrieved from: https://www.poetseers.org/early-american-poets/walt-whitman/whitmans-poetry/a-song-of-joys/index.html

 

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“Song of Myself” Poem by Walt Whitman

 ” I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you. “

– Walt Whitman

Living A Meaningful Life

This is what you should do: love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to everyone that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men … re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss what insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem.

Walt Whitman

Today’s Quote by Walt Whitman

Keep your face always toward the sunshine – and shadows will fall behind you.

Walt Whitman

That Music Always Round Me ~ Poem by Walt Whitman

That Music Always Round Me

by Walt Whitman

THAT music always round me, unceasing, unbeginning,
yet long untaught I did not hear;
But now the chorus I hear, and am elated;
A tenor, strong, ascending, with power and health, with glad notes of day-break I hear,
A soprano, at intervals, sailing buoyantly over the tops of immense waves,
A transparent bass, shuddering lusciously under and through the universe,
The triumphant tutti the funeral wailings, with sweet flutes and violins all
these I fill myself with;
I hear not the volumes of sound, merely I am moved by the exquisite meanings,
I listen to the different voices winding in and out,
striving, contending with fiery vehemence to excel each other in emotion;
I do not think the performers know themselves,
but now I think I begin to know them.